Tag Archives: TPO

5 Thyroid Lies Your Endocrinologist May Try to Tell You

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Originally Posted January 2015Updated September 2019 Endocrinologists, whose “specialization” is the endocrine system — which includes the thyroid gland — are sometimes the worst offenders when it comes to providing dubious information about your thyroid diagnosis and treatment. Get smart, and discover the five lies that your endocrinologist may try to tell you. 1. “Your TSH is Normal.” Integrative doctors consider the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test to be only one of many tests to diagnose and manage thyroid disease. TSH, however, is considered the “gold standard” test by many endocrinologists. Too bad they don’t even agree on the cutoff points for the reference range for this test. Learn about what’s in a complete thyroid panel and get a FREE lab slip here. Some endocrinologists consider any number within the reference range (it’s around .40 to 4.0 at many US labs) “normal,” and others feel that TSH must be as […]

Why You Need Thyroid Tests Before You Get Pregnant

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For more than a decade, doctors have been disagreeing about the benefits of thyroid screening before or during early pregnancy, even though there is clear evidence that even mild hypothyroidism in a woman can cause infertility or miscarriage, and can negatively affect the health and cognitive function of the baby. At the 2012 annual meeting of the American Thyroid Association, researchers distributed a survey asking about universal thyroid screening for pregnancy. A total of 140 of the 561 endocrinologists at the meeting responded. A total of 74 percent were in favor of universal TSH screening during pregnancy; 18 percent opposed it, and 8 percent were unsure. The longer a doctor was in practice, the more likely he or she was to favor universal screening. Even though universal thyroid screening is still not standard practice, if you are a woman planning to get pregnant, it’s a good idea to have your […]

Selenium Plays Key Role in Fertility

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A research team, led by Melanie Ceko, looked at the role of selenium in the ovaries, and found that selenium is crucial to the development of healthy ovarian follicles. Follicles are responsible for production of eggs in women. According to Ceko: Selenium is an essential trace element found in protein-rich foods like red meat, seafood and nuts. It is important for many biological functions, such as immune response, thyroid hormone production, and acts as an antioxidant, helping to detoxify damaging chemicals in the body. We’ve known for some time that selenium is important to men’s fertility, but until now no-one has researched how this element could be involved in healthy reproduction in women. The researchers found exactly where selenium is located in the ovary, and in particular, the selenoprotein known as GPX1. According to Ceko: Our findings are important, because they show that selenium and selenoproteins are at elevated levels […]

Treating Hashimoto’s Can Prevent Overt Hypothyroidism

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Most people who have Hashimoto’s disease -approximately 90% – have antibodies that can be measured in the blood. The Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO) test detects those antibodies. At the same time, around 5% of people who have the disease and were diagnosed by other means (i.e., ultrasound, biopsy, etc.) do not have measurable thyroid antibodies. In one study, researchers looked at patients who had been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but had no measurable antibodies. This group was compared to patients who had Hashimoto’s and antibodies. What they found was that overt hypothyroidism — defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level, and low Free Thyroxine (Free T4) levels was more common in those patients who tested positive for thyroid antibodies. Subclinical hypothyroidism — mildly increased TSH — was more common in the group who did not test positive for antibodies. The researchers concluded that the presence of antibodies was […]

The Link Between Vitamin D and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

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In a Chinese study, researchers looked at vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid disease status in their patients. Their study evaluated 66 patients (34 had Hashimoto’s disease and 32 had Graves’ disease), compared to 52 healthy controls. They measured the serum D3, calcium, parathyroid hormone, Free T3, Free T4, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb), and Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb) in all the patients studied. They found that the patients with autoimmune thyroid disease had Vitamin D3 levels that were significantly lower than the controls. And, interestingly, almost 82% of the autoimmune thyroid disease patients had low Vitamin D. The study defined low Vitamin D as a level of less than 20 ng/ml. The patients who had especially high TPO antibodies — above 1300 — showed significantly lower Vitamin D3 levels. The researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiency was associated with higher TPO antibodies in autoimmune thyroid patients. This suggests […]

5 Things You Should Do Right Now to Conquer Your Thyroid Issues

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1. Understand the Lab Tests for Thyroid Disease Some doctors only use the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test to diagnose and manage thyroid disease, and tell patients that their results are “normal” or “abnormal” — nothing more. Integrative physicians take it much further — often including Free T4, Free T3, Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO), Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulins (TSI), Reverse T3. If you don’t know what these tests measure, and what is “normal,” “abnormal” — or better yet “optimal” — for each of these tests, it’s time to do some homework. You can’t ask for tests that you don’t know about, and you can’t negotiate for optimal treatment if you don’t know what your results mean. Need to learn more? Read Challenges in Thyroid Hormone Therapy: Why Is It So Complicated? 2. Start Keeping Copies of All Your Lab Tests It’s your right — and frankly, smart — to ask for […]

Obesity and Thyroid Disease in Women – The Link Starts in Childhood

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A British study was developed, to look at the connection between childhood obesity and weight gain, and the later development of an underactive thyroid and autoimmune thyroid conditions in the 60 to 64 age range. The researchers were able to access a study group of more 2500+ women, and 2500+ men who were born in the same week, and whose weights and heights were periodically studied through age 64. Among the group, more than 2,000 had TSH, antibodies and other thyroid testing done between age 60 and 64. What they found? At this age point, 10.9% of women and 2.3% of men were taking thyroid hormone replacement medication 11.5% of the women had thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies, and 3.3% of the men had them The women on thyroid hormone replacement had a higher body mass index and body weight than women not taking thyroid medication The women on thyroid hormone […]