Tag Archives: Synthroid

Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism: Types of Thyroid Diseases

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While addressing a thyroid dysfunction, it’s essential to consider the interconnected web of other imbalances, toxicities, and nutritional deficiencies that are always at play. Your thyroid gland is like the body’s energy factory. Every cell in the body requires thyroid hormones. When it’s operating effectively, you feel energetic, healthy, and in control. But it takes the right amount of thyroid hormones, in a careful balance, for the body to function properly. Too little thyroid hormone, and the body slows down. Too much thyroid hormone, and everything speeds up. When talking about thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid diseases, most people only think of hypothyroidism, but in reality there are many more thyroid conditions that can arise. Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism  It’s estimated that between 3 and 10 million people actually suffer from an overactive thyroid, or hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a condition that occurs when the thyroid is overactive and produces too much of one or both […]

Why Levothyroxine — i.e. Synthroid — Treatment Isn’t Working for You

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Conventional medicine believes that if you have an underactive, chemically ablated or surgically-removed thyroid gland, that all you need is levothyroxine – the synthetic form of the T4 hormone. Levothyroxine is also known by its brand names: Synthroid, Levoxyl, Eltroxin, Tirosint, and Levothroid, among others. T4 is the inactive thyroid hormone and must be converted into the active thyroid hormone T3 – triiodothyronine — in order to deliver oxygen and energy to cells, and resolve hypothyroidism. The conventional belief is that the levothyroxine will adequately and effectively convert in the body to T3. As a result, millions of people who are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, or who are hypothyroid after thyroid surgery or Radioactive Iodine (RAI) treatment, are given a prescription for generic or brand name levothyroxine and sent on their way. Even with levothyroxine treatment, however, many of these patients, and you may be among them, continue to experience hypothyroidism […]

13 Numbers About Your Health That You Need To Know

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2.5 OR LOWER Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) levels above 2.5 are considered to be suspicious for subclinical hypothyroidism by many integrative physicians. The “normal” reference range for the TSH test tends to run from .3 to 4.5, and many patients with levels above 2.5 are told their thyroid is “normal,” while their physicians fail to test to actual circulating thyroid hormone (Free T4, Free T3) or the thyroid antibodies that can detect an autoimmune thyroid disease. 1.3 OR HIGHER The Free T4 test measures the available amount of the T4 storage hormone available to be converted into T3, the active thyroid hormone. While the reference range at many labs runs from .8 to 2.8 ng/dL, integrative physicians have found that most patients feel best when their level falls into the top half of the range, at a level of 1.3 or higher. 3.2 OR HIGHER The Free T3 test measures […]

5 Things You Should Do Right Now to Conquer Your Thyroid Issues

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1. Understand the Lab Tests for Thyroid Disease Some doctors only use the Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test to diagnose and manage thyroid disease, and tell patients that their results are “normal” or “abnormal” — nothing more. Integrative physicians take it much further — often including Free T4, Free T3, Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO), Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulins (TSI), Reverse T3. If you don’t know what these tests measure, and what is “normal,” “abnormal” — or better yet “optimal” — for each of these tests, it’s time to do some homework. You can’t ask for tests that you don’t know about, and you can’t negotiate for optimal treatment if you don’t know what your results mean. Need to learn more? Read Challenges in Thyroid Hormone Therapy: Why Is It So Complicated? 2. Start Keeping Copies of All Your Lab Tests It’s your right — and frankly, smart — to ask for […]

The Best Clinical Guidelines Money Can Buy: A Look at Guidelines Bias and Thyroid Treatment

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The article didn’t get much attention in the American medical community, and that’s no surprise. The title of the British Medical Journal article was “Evidence Based Medicine: Why we can’t trust clinical guidelines.” In the June 2013 article, author Jeanne Lenzer describes how drug companies can negatively influence members of committees that create clinical guidelines, to the detriment of patient care. What are Clinical Guidelines? According to the Institute of Medicine, clinical practice guidelines are “statements that include recommendations intended to optimize patient care that are informed by a systematic review of evidence and an assessment of the benefits and harms of alternative care options.” Ideally, these guidelines should be based on rigorous analysis, good science, and the best possible evidence and patient outcomes, without any influence from the manufacturers of the drugs being reviewed, and procedures or medical devices involved in the treatments. In reality, however, as Lenzer identifies, […]

Treating Thyroid Conditions

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It’s important to address the real cause of your imbalances and use the most effective combination of thyroid hormones so you can feel at your best. Everything You Need To Know About Thyroid Treatment Hypothyroidism is generally treated with synthetic T4 (Levothyroxine). Products such as Synthroid and Levoxyl are the most widely accepted forms of thyroid replacement. This is based on an assumption that the body will convert what it needs to the biologically active form T3. However, many people cannot efficiently convert T4 to T3. This is a problem because T3 is the more active form of thyroid hormone. Even if your T4 and TSH levels are optimal, if your T3 levels are imbalanced, you may still experience symptoms. A study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation in 1995 demonstrated that the normalization of plasma TSH and T4 levels with T4-only preparations provide adequate tissue T3 levels to […]