Tag Archives: natural desiccated thyroid

Why Levothyroxine — i.e. Synthroid — Treatment Isn’t Working for You

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Conventional medicine believes that if you have an underactive, chemically ablated or surgically-removed thyroid gland, that all you need is levothyroxine – the synthetic form of the T4 hormone. Levothyroxine is also known by its brand names: Synthroid, Levoxyl, Eltroxin, Tirosint, and Levothroid, among others. T4 is the inactive thyroid hormone, and must be converted into the active thyroid hormone T3 – triiodothyronine — in order to deliver oxygen and energy to cells, and resolve hypothyroidism. The conventional belief is that the levothyroxine will adequately and effectively convert in the body to T3. As a result, millions of people who are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, or who are hypothyroid after thyroid surgery or Radioactive Iodine (RAI) treatment, are given a prescription for generic or brand name levothyroxine, and sent on their way. Even with levothyroxine treatment, however, many of these patients, and you may be among them, continue to experience hypothyroidism […]

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists Launches 2015 Thyroid Awareness Campaign

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Over at the About.com Thyroid site, patient advocate Mary Shomon is sharing details about the new 2015 Thyroid Awareness campaign being promoted by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). Their effort, which is featured at their site, ThyroidAwareness.com, hinges on two initiatives – “Same/Same/Same,” and “Ten Questions to Ask About Your Thyroid Health.” The central theme of their effort is their “Same/Same/Same” initiative, which focuses on telling thyroid patients to take the same drugs, the same way, at the same time every day. The main “tool” of the initiative appears to be an out-of-date and incomplete list of thyroid drugs, including manufacturers and links to photos of pills and capsules. The list notably excludes all natural desiccated thyroid drugs, while including thyroid drugs no longer on the market. Shomon details key concerns with the campaign — including its sponsorship by big drug companies — in her critique of the […]

Five Ways the New ATA Hypothyroidism Guidelines are Bad for Thyroid Patients

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There are so many things wrong with these Guidelines that we could write volumes, but let’s cut to the chase. Here are five ways the new ATA hypothyroidism guidelines hurt thyroid patients. 1. The ATA’s Conflict of Interest Makes the Guidelines Findings Questionable at Best While the ATA goes out of its way to assert that there are no financial conflicts of interests, as patient advocate Mary Shomon points out in her article, the ATA itself receives a substantial amount of financial support from three drug companies – Pfizer, AbbVie, and Akrimax – that make levothyroxine, the drug that the guidelines claim are the “standard of care.” How can the ATA claim a lack of bias and no conflict of interest, when its own balance sheet depends on support from the very drug makers who make the drug they are claiming is superior? 2. The ATA Diminishes the Importance and […]

Challenges in Thyroid Hormone Therapy: Why Is It So Complicated?

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On the one hand, it’s promising to think that a group of prominent endocrinologists are joining together to discuss this important issue. The endocrinology community, after all, is not typically known for acknowledging — much less being curious about — the complexities of thyroid hormone treatment. The tendency is usually to prescribe Synthroid, Levoxyl or another brand name or generic form of levothyroxine, and then write off any unresolved symptoms as unrelated to the thyroid problem, as a consequence of poor lifestyle choices, or even, as a somatoform disorder, also known as a psychosomatic disease. But for two decades, thyroid patients, advocates, and an increasing number of physicians — many of them holistic or integrative — have already been hard at work identifying and successfully identifying effective solutions to the challenges of thyroid hormone therapy. To some extent, it’s complicated because the endocrinology world makes it so. The Limitations of […]