Tag Archives: lyme disease

Mimi’s Story: My Journey to Health

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Five years ago, my life drastically changed. I was bitten by a tick while on the east coast at a picnic.  I found it within the hour and pulled it off. I did not see a bullseye, and it was not on me for more than 24 hours, so I decided not to take the course of antibiotics typically prescribed when you have Lyme disease. To this day, it is the biggest regret of my life. The last five years for me have been some of the most difficult of my life. The symptoms first started as plantar fasciitis. Then I had a frozen shoulder that I thought was from tennis. Then my right hip started hurting, then debilitating fatigue.  After a few months, I knew it was Lyme because my children and husband have had it. I went to get tested by a doctor in NYC who confirmed my […]

Get the 411 on Lyme Disease Treatment

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Treatment for Lyme disease can be divided into two major categories: acute Lyme disease and chronic Lyme disease. In both cases, the most important thing to consider is that Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme causing bacteria, has several forms: the cell wall form, cystic forms and organisms in the intracellular compartment and biofilms. Certain antibiotics will only work when the organism is actively dividing and reproducing, so the standard treatment of 2-3 weeks of antibiotic treatment will not work. Early Lyme After a tick bite, Borrelia burgdorferi spreads rapidly in the bloodstream and, for example, can be found within the central nervous system as soon as twelve hours after entering the bloodstream. This is why even early infections require full dose antibiotic therapy. However, if patients have multiple rashes, or a stiff neck, headaches or tingling/numbness in extremities, then the organism has disseminated and one month of antibiotics is insufficient. These […]

The Connection Between Lyme Disease and Psychiatric Disorders

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Up to 40% of patients with Lyme disease develop neurologic involvement of either the peripheral or central nervous system. A broad range of psychiatric reactions have been associated with Lyme disease including paranoia, dementia, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, panic attacks, major depression, anorexia nervosa, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Depressive states among patients with late Lyme disease are fairly common, ranging across studies from 26% to 66%. In a published study (Hajek et al, Am J Psychiatry 2002;159:297-301), one third of psychiatric patients showed signs of an infection with the Lyme spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi. Psychiatrists who work in endemic areas need to include Lyme disease in the differential diagnosis of any atypical psychiatric disorder. Symptoms of Neurological Lyme disease Dissemination to the central nervous system can occur within the first few weeks after skin infection. Like syphilis, Lyme disease may have a latency period of months to years before symptoms of late infection […]

What the CDC Doesn’t Want You To Know About Lyme

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If you suffer from Lyme, you might be on a path through the complicated maze of multiple systemic disease diagnosis and management. You may have visited numerous doctors who incorrectly diagnosed you and offered inconclusive and inaccurate tests. This is because the conventional medical system lacks an understanding of and treatments for most chronic diseases. A typical journey of a patient with Lyme begins with a primary care physician or a family doctor. A maximum of thirty days of antibiotics is the accepted standard of care in such situations. If patients report back that they are not getting better, they are likely diagnosed with other disorders, like “post Lyme syndrome,” chronic fatigue syndrome or fibromyalgia. After a few other useless prescriptions, they are told to take it as it is and live with their symptoms. These practitioners usually believe that Lyme is an easily diagnosed and treatable condition. In reality, the lab […]

Things You Should Know About Lyme Disease

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Your risk of getting Lyme disease is higher than you might think. According to the latest reports the number of cases is as high as about 500,000 per year in the US. Whatever your experience with Lyme disease might be, the information out there can be overwhelming, confusing, contradictory, and even controversial. Many people will agree that only the proper education on the matter will eventually help you get to the right doctor and treatment plan for you. How Do You Get Lyme Disease? The disease is caused by a spiral-shaped bacteria (spirochete) called Borrelia Burgdorferi, transmitted by ticks. The Lyme spirochete can cause infection of multiple organs and produce a wide range of symptoms. Fewer than 50% of patients with Lyme disease recall a tick bite. In some studies this number is as low as 15% in culture-proven infection with the Lyme spirochete. Watch this to find out other ways the disease […]

Lyme Disease Update: Spreading and Causing More Suffering

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One of our medical practice’s specializations is in helping patients get properly diagnosed with Lyme disease suffered by our patients.  We know that Lyme disease has spread to the West Coast, and has a number of symptoms and health implications. New studies are now exploring the migration patterns of the black-legged tick, and the burden it places on its victims. The Low-Down on Lyme Disease Most people are aware Lyme disease is a tick-borne illness.  Understanding how ticks spread Lyme, and the bacteria that causes it, gives you better understanding of the disease and maybe, how to avoid it.  Consider these facts: Found on every continent except Antarctica, Lyme disease is diagnosed in approximately 300,000 Americans per year. Recent research suggests the spread of Lyme disease occurred as a result of ongoing migration of black-legged ticks from original southern populations into northern and western regions. Originally documented in the small […]

Lyme Disease and Hypothyroidism: Is There a Connection?

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Specifically, some research has shown that the Borrelia bacteria that causes Lyme Disease can trigger Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in some people. So there are some patients who had undiagnosed or untreated Lyme Disease, only to go on to develop an underactive thyroid later. If you have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but are not seemingly responding to thyroid hormone replacement treatment, familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. Thorough testing with practitioners who have expertise in Lyme Disease diagnose a Lyme infection, and get you on track towards treatment. Early Symptoms of Lyme Disease (3-30 days after the tick bite) Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM) or a “bulls-eye” rash — can reach 12 inches across, and usually shows up around 7 days after the bite. Fatigue Chills Fever Headache Muscle and joint aches Swollen lymph nodes Early Stage Symptoms of Lyme Disease (Days to weeks after the […]

Lyme Disease and Psychiatric Disorders

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Untangling cause and effect can challenge even seasoned clinicians, and the potential for missed diagnoses is growing these days. Most mental-health counselors rely on primary-care doctors to spot medical issues, but those physicians are increasingly time-pressed and may not know their patients well. Neither do the psychiatrists who mainly write prescriptions and see patients only briefly. The Connection Between Lyme and Mental Illness Lyme disease has become the undiagnosed and untreated epidemic of the 21st century. While it is often attributed to tick bites, recent studies have also shown that it may also be transmitted by mosquitoes. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) which can mimic virtually any disease often leading to misdiagnosis such as Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, fibromyalgia and depression. Lyme disease is a serious condition affecting multiple areas of the body with symptoms appearing within 1-2 weeks after being bitten and often […]

Infectious Diseases: A Cause of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

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Infections can either trigger or contribute to CFS. These may include viruses such as Epstein Barr or herpes, or bacterial infections, including Lyme disease. Chronic fatigue syndrome is not a “mysterious” disease anymore. It can be treated, if all underlying factors are properly diagnosed and addressed. Infections Present With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Numerous studies have demonstrated a high incidence of chronic infections in chronic fatigue syndrome. These include viral infections of Epstein Barr (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), human herpes virus-6, (HHV-6), and bacterial infections such as mycoplasma, chlamydia pneumonia (CP) and Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease). A study published in Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica et Immunologica Scandinavica found that 52% of CFS patients had active mycoplamsa infection, 30.5% had active HHV-6 infection, and 7.5% had Chlamydia pneumonia infections vs. only 6%, 9% and 1% of controls, respectively. Another study published in the Journal Immunology and Medical Microbiology also confirmed there is a high […]