Tag Archives: Hypothyroidism

Heart Disease: How Hypo- and Hyperthyroidism Could Increase Your Risk

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According to the World Heart Federation, heart disease is the number one killer of women around the world, with more than 8.6 million lives taken every year. This represents one-third of all deaths, and cardiovascular disease kills more women than cancer, tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria combined. The Whole Heart Federation states: “Despite progresses in the past years, women are still discriminated against when it comes to the management and treatment of cardiovascular disease. They are more likely than men to be under-diagnosed and under-treated, mostly because the presentation, progression and outcomes of the disease are different and less understood in women than in men.” In a Dutch study called “The Rotterdam Study,” it was found that older women with subclinical hypothyroidism were almost twice as likely as women without this condition to have blockages in the aorta. They were also twice as likely to have had heart attacks. Having autoimmune hypothyroidism increased the risk even further. […]

How Your (Hypo)Thyroid(ism) Impacts Your Metabolism

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Gastrointestinal Function Chronic constipation is a common complaint of people with an underactive thyroid gland. Poor thyroid function slows down the amount of time it takes for food to move through the intestines. This increases the potential of gut infections from harmful bacteria and yeast, leading to inflammation, malabsorption, and increased risk of developing food intolerances. The production of gastric acid depends on the hormone gastrin, which diminishes with hypothyroidism. This can cause digestive complaints like bloating, heartburn, gas, and infections. In people with hypothyroidism and low stomach acid, protein deficiency may occur. Thyroid hormones strongly influence the tight junctions in the stomach and small intestine, which form the impermeable barrier of the gut. “Leaky gut” (increased intestinal permeability) is a major contributor to thyroid autoimmune diseases like Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Studies showed that T3 and T4 thyroid hormones protect gut mucosal lining from stress induced ulcer formation. Inflammation in the gut […]

Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism: Types of Thyroid Diseases

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While addressing a thyroid dysfunction, it’s essential to consider the interconnected web of other imbalances, toxicities, and nutritional deficiencies that are always at play. Your thyroid gland is like the body’s energy factory. Every cell in the body requires thyroid hormones. When it’s operating effectively, you feel energetic, healthy, and in control. But it takes the right amount of thyroid hormones, in a careful balance, for the body to function properly. Too little thyroid hormone, and the body slows down. Too much thyroid hormone, and everything speeds up. When talking about thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid diseases, most people only think of hypothyroidism, but in reality there are many more thyroid conditions that can arise. Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism  It’s estimated that between 3 and 10 million people actually suffer from an overactive thyroid, or hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a condition that occurs when the thyroid is overactive and produces too much of one or both […]

What You Need to Know About The 4 “T”s to Thyroid Testing

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What is happening here? Many doctors rely only on TSH marker to diagnose and manage thyroid disease; however, this is just one of the four needed markers to establish a correct interpretation and analysis of your thyroid status. Moreover, many doctors use the lab ranges (referred to as “pathological” or disease ranges) that come with the test results, instead of functional ranges, which have been carefully researched and formulated as parameters of good thyroid health. The lab ranges are simply the averages of all the people who have had blood work analyzed by that lab in the last year. They are so called “normal” or “healthy” places to be but are actually statistical averages. Different labs can and do have different reference ranges. It is common to have a test result come back “normal” from one lab and “out of range” for another lab. In truth, if your lab values […]

5 Tips to Thrive with Your Thyroid in 2017

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Why is it that when having a thyroid dysfunction, one might feel so drained and unwell all throughout the body? Because the thyroid controls the rate of energy production, maintains body temperature, regulates body weight, menstrual cycles, muscle strength, heart rate, breathing, and affects brain chemistry profoundly, influencing mood and emotions. No wonder that any dysfunctions in its activity will be intensely felt throughout the body! Regard for Healthy Food Food IS the best medicine. The way our food is grown and consumed should be based on respect, both for the food and our body. It is estimated that today only 10% of all American adults consume enough healthy foods for their diet to qualify as “good,” according to researchers at the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Fortunately, there is a wealth of information today that is accessible and meant to help you find out what diet is […]

Research Leads to Discovery of New Form of Genetically-based Obesity

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Obesity plays such an important role in so many health problems in developed countries, and as such, is an important research topic. Recently, use of genetic sequencing allowed a team of researchers from Imperial College London to discover the first known person with a genetic deficiency formerly seen only in animal studies. The study, published in PLOS ONE, adds to our growing knowledge of genetic factors that contribute to satiety, hunger, weight gain, and diabetes. Genetic Inheritance Leads to the Lack of an Important Protein The study focused on the genetic background of a young woman and six of her family members.  The 20-year old woman at the center of the study suffered Type 2 diabetes, morbid obesity, learning problems, and reproductive difficulties. Members of her family were mildly obese, and her older brother—who exhibited similar symptoms—died when he was 21 from unknown causes.  She came to the attention of […]

What Goes Up…Must Come Down: The Health Impact of Fireworks

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Let’s take a look at the health impact of fireworks. What is in a firework? A little strontium nitrate, a pinch of calcium sulfate, black powder, oxidizing agent, and binder and we are all set.  A firework, or its smaller cousin, the firecracker, are products intended to go out with a bang—and sometimes a burst of color.  For as complicated as they look—the chemistry behind them is pretty understandable. To delight the eye on the 4th of July, fireworks manufacturers pack a cardboard shell with black powder that boosts the shell skyward.  A time-delay fuse from the powder burns through to the bursting charge at the right altitude.  The bursting charge holds specially designed stars that are the heart of the colors and shapes you love to see go ka-boom. As the bursting charge ignites, gases created by chemical reaction expand, heating metal salts packed in the shell.  Those burning […]

Another Reason to Avoid Artificial Sweeteners: Hashimoto’s Disease

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We’ve talked about new research that shows that artificial sweeteners do not help with weight loss. In fact, they actually contribute to weight gain and difficulty losing weight. We also pointed out the link between diet sodas — which use artificial sweeteners — and the link to metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Now, a new study has given us another reason to avoid artificial sweeteners: Hashimoto’s disease.   Mary Shomon has posted about the new study, which showed a correlation between artificial sweeteners and elevated TSH levels in Hashimoto’s patients. In comparison to antibody-negative people without Hashimoto’s disease, the antibody-positive patients were also far more likely to be using artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. 

Why Levothyroxine — i.e. Synthroid — Treatment Isn’t Working for You

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Conventional medicine believes that if you have an underactive, chemically ablated or surgically-removed thyroid gland, that all you need is levothyroxine – the synthetic form of the T4 hormone. Levothyroxine is also known by its brand names: Synthroid, Levoxyl, Eltroxin, Tirosint, and Levothroid, among others. T4 is the inactive thyroid hormone and must be converted into the active thyroid hormone T3 – triiodothyronine — in order to deliver oxygen and energy to cells, and resolve hypothyroidism. The conventional belief is that the levothyroxine will adequately and effectively convert in the body to T3. As a result, millions of people who are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, or who are hypothyroid after thyroid surgery or Radioactive Iodine (RAI) treatment, are given a prescription for generic or brand name levothyroxine and sent on their way. Even with levothyroxine treatment, however, many of these patients, and you may be among them, continue to experience hypothyroidism […]

Lyme Disease and Hypothyroidism: Is There a Connection?

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Specifically, some research has shown that the Borrelia bacteria that causes Lyme Disease can trigger Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in some people. So there are some patients who had undiagnosed or untreated Lyme Disease, only to go on to develop an underactive thyroid later. If you have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but are not seemingly responding to thyroid hormone replacement treatment, familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. Thorough testing with practitioners who have expertise in Lyme Disease diagnose a Lyme infection, and get you on track towards treatment. Early Symptoms of Lyme Disease (3-30 days after the tick bite) Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM) or a “bulls-eye” rash — can reach 12 inches across, and usually shows up around 7 days after the bite. Fatigue Chills Fever Headache Muscle and joint aches Swollen lymph nodes Early Stage Symptoms of Lyme Disease (Days to weeks after the […]

Is Intermittent Fasting a Key to Weight Loss?

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We know that full-on fasting – such as ultra-low calorie diets, or low-cal juice cleanses — tend to lower the metabolism and bring down the metabolic set-point, especially in people with thyroid issues such as hypothyroidism. But research has shown that short-term fasting does not have this permanent impact on metabolism, while potentially offering a number of other benefits. A 2013 study from the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease found that IF diets can help combat diabetes and heart disease, lowering blood pressure, reducing insulin levels, and resulting in weight loss. More recently, Yale School of Medicine researchers discovered that a compound produced by the body when fasting can actually block responses that are involved in various inflammatory disorders. Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is produced when fasting, restricting calories, or on a ultra-low carbohydrate ketogenic diet. BHB inhibits the production of a protein that plays a key role in inflammation […]

Thyroid Drug Interactions: Drugs That Affect Thyroid Hormone Replacement Absorption

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There are a variety of reasons why you may need to take a larger-than-usual dose of thyroid hormone replacement medication— but one of the most common reason is that you are taking a prescription or over-the-counter medication that affects absorption of your thyroid medication. For example, before you grab that Tums or Rolaids along with a thyroid drug, think again. Antacids that include calcium carbonate and/or aluminum hydroxide can significantly reduce thyroid medication absorption. (There’s some evidence that antacids with magnesium may also have an effect.) They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Iron also supplements impair absorption. They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Some other absorption blockers: Sucralfate – ulcer drug – allow at least 8 hours apart Cholestyramine and other cholesterol lowering drugs – 4-6 hours apart Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and other quinolone antibiotics – at least 4 […]