Tag Archives: Hashimoto’s disease

Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism: Types of Thyroid Diseases

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While addressing a thyroid dysfunction, it’s essential to consider the interconnected web of other imbalances, toxicities, and nutritional deficiencies that are always at play. Your thyroid gland is like the body’s energy factory. Every cell in the body requires thyroid hormones. When it’s operating effectively, you feel energetic, healthy, and in control. But it takes the right amount of thyroid hormones, in a careful balance, for the body to function properly. Too little thyroid hormone, and the body slows down. Too much thyroid hormone, and everything speeds up. When talking about thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid diseases, most people only think of hypothyroidism, but in reality there are many more thyroid conditions that can arise. Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism  It’s estimated that between 3 and 10 million people actually suffer from an overactive thyroid, or hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a condition that occurs when the thyroid is overactive and produces too much of one or both […]

What You Need to Know About The 4 “T”s to Thyroid Testing

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What is happening here? Many doctors rely only on TSH marker to diagnose and manage thyroid disease; however, this is just one of the four needed markers to establish a correct interpretation and analysis of your thyroid status. Moreover, many doctors use the lab ranges (referred to as “pathological” or disease ranges) that come with the test results, instead of functional ranges, which have been carefully researched and formulated as parameters of good thyroid health. The lab ranges are simply the averages of all the people who have had blood work analyzed by that lab in the last year. They are so called “normal” or “healthy” places to be but are actually statistical averages. Different labs can and do have different reference ranges. It is common to have a test result come back “normal” from one lab and “out of range” for another lab. In truth, if your lab values […]

5 Tips to Thrive with Your Thyroid in 2017

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Why is it that when having a thyroid dysfunction, one might feel so drained and unwell all throughout the body? Because the thyroid controls the rate of energy production, maintains body temperature, regulates body weight, menstrual cycles, muscle strength, heart rate, breathing, and affects brain chemistry profoundly, influencing mood and emotions. No wonder that any dysfunctions in its activity will be intensely felt throughout the body! Regard for Healthy Food Food IS the best medicine. The way our food is grown and consumed should be based on respect, both for the food and our body. It is estimated that today only 10% of all American adults consume enough healthy foods for their diet to qualify as “good,” according to researchers at the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Fortunately, there is a wealth of information today that is accessible and meant to help you find out what diet is […]

Another Reason to Avoid Artificial Sweeteners: Hashimoto’s Disease

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We’ve talked about new research that shows that artificial sweeteners do not help with weight loss. In fact, they actually contribute to weight gain and difficulty losing weight. We also pointed out the link between diet sodas — which use artificial sweeteners — and the link to metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Now, a new study has given us another reason to avoid artificial sweeteners: Hashimoto’s disease.   Mary Shomon has posted about the new study, which showed a correlation between artificial sweeteners and elevated TSH levels in Hashimoto’s patients. In comparison to antibody-negative people without Hashimoto’s disease, the antibody-positive patients were also far more likely to be using artificial sweeteners on a daily basis. 

Lyme Disease and Hypothyroidism: Is There a Connection?

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Specifically, some research has shown that the Borrelia bacteria that causes Lyme Disease can trigger Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in some people. So there are some patients who had undiagnosed or untreated Lyme Disease, only to go on to develop an underactive thyroid later. If you have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but are not seemingly responding to thyroid hormone replacement treatment, familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. Thorough testing with practitioners who have expertise in Lyme Disease diagnose a Lyme infection, and get you on track towards treatment. Early Symptoms of Lyme Disease (3-30 days after the tick bite) Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM) or a “bulls-eye” rash — can reach 12 inches across, and usually shows up around 7 days after the bite. Fatigue Chills Fever Headache Muscle and joint aches Swollen lymph nodes Early Stage Symptoms of Lyme Disease (Days to weeks after the […]

Thyroid Drug Interactions: Drugs That Affect Thyroid Hormone Replacement Absorption

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There are a variety of reasons why you may need to take a larger-than-usual dose of thyroid hormone replacement medication— but one of the most common reason is that you are taking a prescription or over-the-counter medication that affects absorption of your thyroid medication. For example, before you grab that Tums or Rolaids along with a thyroid drug, think again. Antacids that include calcium carbonate and/or aluminum hydroxide can significantly reduce thyroid medication absorption. (There’s some evidence that antacids with magnesium may also have an effect.) They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Iron also supplements impair absorption. They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Some other absorption blockers: Sucralfate – ulcer drug – allow at least 8 hours apart Cholestyramine and other cholesterol lowering drugs – 4-6 hours apart Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and other quinolone antibiotics – at least 4 […]

Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Antibodies Increase Risk of Early Miscarriage

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Researchers looked at whether subclinical hypothyroidism and/or autoimmune thyroid disease during early pregnancy — the 4 to 8 week period  — was also associated with higher rates of miscarriage. The researchers evaluated more than 3,000 women in early pregnancy. They grouped the women according to the severity of their subclinical hypothyroidism, as well as presence of antibodies/autoimmune thyroid disease, and then compared the miscarriage rates. The women were classified as: normal thyroid function subclinical hypothyroidism autoimmune thyroid disease subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease Of the group, 3.5% had miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation. The women who had subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid disease or both had the highest risks, compared to women with normal thyroid function. Specifically, the women with both subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease not only had a higher risk, but also tended to have earlier miscariages. What This Means for You? While endocrinologists are not […]

Treating Hashimoto’s Can Prevent Overt Hypothyroidism

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Most people who have Hashimoto’s disease -approximately 90% – have antibodies that can be measured in the blood. The Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO) test detects those antibodies. At the same time, around 5% of people who have the disease and were diagnosed by other means (i.e., ultrasound, biopsy, etc.) do not have measurable thyroid antibodies. In one study, researchers looked at patients who had been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but had no measurable antibodies. This group was compared to patients who had Hashimoto’s and antibodies. What they found was that overt hypothyroidism — defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level, and low Free Thyroxine (Free T4) levels was more common in those patients who tested positive for thyroid antibodies. Subclinical hypothyroidism — mildly increased TSH — was more common in the group who did not test positive for antibodies. The researchers concluded that the presence of antibodies was […]

The Link Between Vitamin D and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

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In a Chinese study, researchers looked at vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid disease status in their patients. Their study evaluated 66 patients (34 had Hashimoto’s disease and 32 had Graves’ disease), compared to 52 healthy controls. They measured the serum D3, calcium, parathyroid hormone, Free T3, Free T4, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb), and Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb) in all the patients studied. They found that the patients with autoimmune thyroid disease had Vitamin D3 levels that were significantly lower than the controls. And, interestingly, almost 82% of the autoimmune thyroid disease patients had low Vitamin D. The study defined low Vitamin D as a level of less than 20 ng/ml. The patients who had especially high TPO antibodies — above 1300 — showed significantly lower Vitamin D3 levels. The researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiency was associated with higher TPO antibodies in autoimmune thyroid patients. This suggests […]

Hormonal Horror Stories – Especially for Halloween

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Rosemarie’s Baby Rosemarie* was trying, and failing, to get pregnant for several years. Like many fertility clinics, the clinic she and her husband chose did NOT include any thyroid testing as part of Rosemarie’s infertility workup. At first, Rosemarie didn’t know to ask. Since infertility is rarely covered by insurance, Rosemarie was getting side-effect laden hormone injections, and she and her husband were laying out many thousands of dollars each cycle for assisted reproduction. Every month, the pregnancy test showed “negative.” After spending all their savings, with no baby on the way, Rosemarie did some reading, and learned about the thyroid connection to fertility. She was tested, and the doctor found she had an elevated TSH, and high thyroid peroxidase antibodies, indicative of Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. She was started on thyroid hormone replacement therapy. Just two months later, Rosemarie was able to get pregnant – no assisted reproduction needed. Nine months […]

Challenges in Thyroid Hormone Therapy: Why Is It So Complicated?

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On the one hand, it’s promising to think that a group of prominent endocrinologists are joining together to discuss this important issue. The endocrinology community, after all, is not typically known for acknowledging — much less being curious about — the complexities of thyroid hormone treatment. The tendency is usually to prescribe Synthroid, Levoxyl or another brand name or generic form of levothyroxine, and then write off any unresolved symptoms as unrelated to the thyroid problem, as a consequence of poor lifestyle choices, or even, as a somatoform disorder, also known as a psychosomatic disease. But for two decades, thyroid patients, advocates, and an increasing number of physicians — many of them holistic or integrative — have already been hard at work identifying and successfully identifying effective solutions to the challenges of thyroid hormone therapy. To some extent, it’s complicated because the endocrinology world makes it so. The Limitations of […]