Tag Archives: autoimmune thyroid disease

Immune System & Thyroid: Are They at War?

Written by

But how do the immune system cells actually start destroying the body they were designed to protect? It happens when some people don’t make enough T-suppressor cells, so the immune system’s attack goes on and on. Some people make too much interleukin 2(IL-2); then, an overabundance of natural killer and cytotoxic T-cells are deployed, putting healthy tissue at risk. There are also people who can make too much interleukin 4 (IL-4); then , an overabundance of B-cells looking for intruders to tag may accidentally mark healthy tissue, like the thyroid. The Immune System and Your Underactive Thyroid One of the common causes of an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism) is autoimmune thyroiditis. With autoimmune thyroiditis, you make antibodies that attach to your own thyroid gland, which affect the gland’s function. The thyroid gland is then not able to make enough thyroxine and hypothyroidism gradually develops. Antibodies are a sign of some […]

Immune or Not Immune: Are You Protected Against Infections?

Written by

According to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), 50 million Americans — 20 percent of the population — suffer from autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases are more common in women during childbearing years. They frequently appear in women who have just had a baby, after periods of high emotional or physical stress or accidents, with infections, during periods of hormonal change such as perimenopause, or after starting birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy. In the United States, the most common autoimmune diseases are thyroid diseases such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and Graves’ disease. Infections and Autoimmune Diseases There is more and more evidence of the role that chronic bacterial or viral infections play in the development of autoimmune disease. No one knows exactly how infections trigger autoimmune diseases, but because our immune systems are so complicated and each infection is unique, it’s likely that there are multiple factors involved. Many autoimmune diseases […]

Hyperthyroidism vs. Hypothyroidism: Types of Thyroid Diseases

Written by

While addressing a thyroid dysfunction, it’s essential to consider the interconnected web of other imbalances, toxicities, and nutritional deficiencies that are always at play. Your thyroid gland is like the body’s energy factory. Every cell in the body requires thyroid hormones. When it’s operating effectively, you feel energetic, healthy, and in control. But it takes the right amount of thyroid hormones, in a careful balance, for the body to function properly. Too little thyroid hormone, and the body slows down. Too much thyroid hormone, and everything speeds up. When talking about thyroid dysfunctions and thyroid diseases, most people only think of hypothyroidism, but in reality there are many more thyroid conditions that can arise. Non-Autoimmune Hyperthyroidism  It’s estimated that between 3 and 10 million people actually suffer from an overactive thyroid, or hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a condition that occurs when the thyroid is overactive and produces too much of one or both […]

What You Need to Know About The 4 “T”s to Thyroid Testing

Written by

What is happening here? Many doctors rely only on TSH marker to diagnose and manage thyroid disease; however, this is just one of the four needed markers to establish a correct interpretation and analysis of your thyroid status. Moreover, many doctors use the lab ranges (referred to as “pathological” or disease ranges) that come with the test results, instead of functional ranges, which have been carefully researched and formulated as parameters of good thyroid health. The lab ranges are simply the averages of all the people who have had blood work analyzed by that lab in the last year. They are so called “normal” or “healthy” places to be but are actually statistical averages. Different labs can and do have different reference ranges. It is common to have a test result come back “normal” from one lab and “out of range” for another lab. In truth, if your lab values […]

5 Tips to Thrive with Your Thyroid in 2017

Written by

Why is it that when having a thyroid dysfunction, one might feel so drained and unwell all throughout the body? Because the thyroid controls the rate of energy production, maintains body temperature, regulates body weight, menstrual cycles, muscle strength, heart rate, breathing, and affects brain chemistry profoundly, influencing mood and emotions. No wonder that any dysfunctions in its activity will be intensely felt throughout the body! Regard for Healthy Food Food IS the best medicine. The way our food is grown and consumed should be based on respect, both for the food and our body. It is estimated that today only 10% of all American adults consume enough healthy foods for their diet to qualify as “good,” according to researchers at the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. Fortunately, there is a wealth of information today that is accessible and meant to help you find out what diet is […]

Lyme Disease and Hypothyroidism: Is There a Connection?

Written by

Specifically, some research has shown that the Borrelia bacteria that causes Lyme Disease can trigger Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in some people. So there are some patients who had undiagnosed or untreated Lyme Disease, only to go on to develop an underactive thyroid later. If you have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, but are not seemingly responding to thyroid hormone replacement treatment, familiarize yourself with the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. Thorough testing with practitioners who have expertise in Lyme Disease diagnose a Lyme infection, and get you on track towards treatment. Early Symptoms of Lyme Disease (3-30 days after the tick bite) Red, expanding rash called erythema migrans (EM) or a “bulls-eye” rash — can reach 12 inches across, and usually shows up around 7 days after the bite. Fatigue Chills Fever Headache Muscle and joint aches Swollen lymph nodes Early Stage Symptoms of Lyme Disease (Days to weeks after the […]

Is Intermittent Fasting a Key to Weight Loss?

Written by

We know that full-on fasting – such as ultra-low calorie diets, or low-cal juice cleanses — tend to lower the metabolism and bring down the metabolic set-point, especially in people with thyroid issues such as hypothyroidism. But research has shown that short-term fasting does not have this permanent impact on metabolism, while potentially offering a number of other benefits. A 2013 study from the British Journal of Diabetes and Vascular Disease found that IF diets can help combat diabetes and heart disease, lowering blood pressure, reducing insulin levels, and resulting in weight loss. More recently, Yale School of Medicine researchers discovered that a compound produced by the body when fasting can actually block responses that are involved in various inflammatory disorders. Beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is produced when fasting, restricting calories, or on a ultra-low carbohydrate ketogenic diet. BHB inhibits the production of a protein that plays a key role in inflammation […]

Thyroid Drug Interactions: Drugs That Affect Thyroid Hormone Replacement Absorption

Written by

There are a variety of reasons why you may need to take a larger-than-usual dose of thyroid hormone replacement medication— but one of the most common reason is that you are taking a prescription or over-the-counter medication that affects absorption of your thyroid medication. For example, before you grab that Tums or Rolaids along with a thyroid drug, think again. Antacids that include calcium carbonate and/or aluminum hydroxide can significantly reduce thyroid medication absorption. (There’s some evidence that antacids with magnesium may also have an effect.) They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Iron also supplements impair absorption. They should be taken four to six hours apart from thyroid medications. Some other absorption blockers: Sucralfate – ulcer drug – allow at least 8 hours apart Cholestyramine and other cholesterol lowering drugs – 4-6 hours apart Ciprofloxacin (Cipro) and other quinolone antibiotics – at least 4 […]

Selenium Plays Key Role in Fertility

Written by

A research team, led by Melanie Ceko, looked at the role of selenium in the ovaries, and found that selenium is crucial to the development of healthy ovarian follicles. Follicles are responsible for production of eggs in women. According to Ceko: Selenium is an essential trace element found in protein-rich foods like red meat, seafood and nuts. It is important for many biological functions, such as immune response, thyroid hormone production, and acts as an antioxidant, helping to detoxify damaging chemicals in the body. We’ve known for some time that selenium is important to men’s fertility, but until now no-one has researched how this element could be involved in healthy reproduction in women. The researchers found exactly where selenium is located in the ovary, and in particular, the selenoprotein known as GPX1. According to Ceko: Our findings are important, because they show that selenium and selenoproteins are at elevated levels […]

Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Thyroid Antibodies Increase Risk of Early Miscarriage

Written by

Researchers looked at whether subclinical hypothyroidism and/or autoimmune thyroid disease during early pregnancy — the 4 to 8 week period  — was also associated with higher rates of miscarriage. The researchers evaluated more than 3,000 women in early pregnancy. They grouped the women according to the severity of their subclinical hypothyroidism, as well as presence of antibodies/autoimmune thyroid disease, and then compared the miscarriage rates. The women were classified as: normal thyroid function subclinical hypothyroidism autoimmune thyroid disease subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease Of the group, 3.5% had miscarriages before 20 weeks of gestation. The women who had subclinical hypothyroidism, autoimmune thyroid disease or both had the highest risks, compared to women with normal thyroid function. Specifically, the women with both subclinical hypothyroidism and autoimmune thyroid disease not only had a higher risk, but also tended to have earlier miscariages. What This Means for You? While endocrinologists are not […]

Treating Hashimoto’s Can Prevent Overt Hypothyroidism

Written by

Most people who have Hashimoto’s disease -approximately 90% – have antibodies that can be measured in the blood. The Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPO) test detects those antibodies. At the same time, around 5% of people who have the disease and were diagnosed by other means (i.e., ultrasound, biopsy, etc.) do not have measurable thyroid antibodies. In one study, researchers looked at patients who had been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, but had no measurable antibodies. This group was compared to patients who had Hashimoto’s and antibodies. What they found was that overt hypothyroidism — defined as an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level, and low Free Thyroxine (Free T4) levels was more common in those patients who tested positive for thyroid antibodies. Subclinical hypothyroidism — mildly increased TSH — was more common in the group who did not test positive for antibodies. The researchers concluded that the presence of antibodies was […]

The Link Between Vitamin D and Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

Written by

In a Chinese study, researchers looked at vitamin D and autoimmune thyroid disease status in their patients. Their study evaluated 66 patients (34 had Hashimoto’s disease and 32 had Graves’ disease), compared to 52 healthy controls. They measured the serum D3, calcium, parathyroid hormone, Free T3, Free T4, Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH), Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb), and Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb) in all the patients studied. They found that the patients with autoimmune thyroid disease had Vitamin D3 levels that were significantly lower than the controls. And, interestingly, almost 82% of the autoimmune thyroid disease patients had low Vitamin D. The study defined low Vitamin D as a level of less than 20 ng/ml. The patients who had especially high TPO antibodies — above 1300 — showed significantly lower Vitamin D3 levels. The researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiency was associated with higher TPO antibodies in autoimmune thyroid patients. This suggests […]